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「The Final Crash: Addictive Debt and the Deformation of the World Economy」
Hugo Bouleau (著)
Kanji Ishizumiが主催する政治、経済、文化、哲学の勉強会丸の内スクエア・アカデミーのサイトにて販売中です。

 

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これならわかる実践M&A事典
「会社合併実務の手引」(新日本法規出版)
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これならわかる実践M&A事典
「これならわかる実践M&A事典」(プレジデント社)

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柴犬とEnglish terrier すみません、本当のことを書いちゃって、辞めさせていただきます。イギリスの駐米大使辞任に思うこと。

イギリス人にも読んでもらいたいので英語です。


 
 
An unusual approach to statecraft

 

I am dismayed at the recent events in the United States that culminated in the resignation of the British Ambassador, Sir Kim Darroch.  He was highly respected and popular in Washington, and well-connected with the White House.  His leaked observations about the Trump administration merely reflected his role of keeping the British government informed about his views on how his host country was being run.  

 
Sir Kim’s comments included the characterisation of President Trump’s withdrawal from the Iranian nuclear agreement as an act of “diplomatic vandalism”


motivated by the latter’s wish to sabotage one of the landmark achievements of his predecessor, Barack Obama.  The deal which
Mr Obama forged with Iran, while not perfect, held promise of keeping the Middle East somewhat more peaceful and secure than it now seems.  Thanks to Mr Trump’s reckless action, the risk of nuclear proliferation in the region is now substantially higher.  His outrageous behaviour fully merits the comments contained in Sir Kim’s report.  And who, whether in the diplomatic community or outside, could have been surprised by them? 
 
 


President Trump’s vitriolic outburst aimed at Sir Kim on Twitter was utterly outrageous – not least because Mr Trump claimed not to know the British Ambassador.  To make matters worse, he extended his tantrum to include criticism of Prime Minister May and her handling of Brexit.

Whatever one may think of the UK’s plans to leave the European Union, the matter is not one upon which the leader of a foreign government should pronounce in so intemperate and discourteous a tone.  Indeed, 10 Downing Street is not an annex of
the Oval Office. 
 
Sir Kim resigned because Mr Trump’s boorish comments and his petulant action in rescinding an invitation to a dinner at the White House created an atmosphere in which the Ambassador felt he could no longer do his job properly.  The President’s refusal to engage with the senior diplomatic representative of a foreign government, especially when that government is one of his country’s closest allies, is unprecedented in modern

times.  It does not bode well for the future.
 


Tough as Sir Kim’s situation was, I am disappointed that Prime Minister May accepted his resignation.  She should not have done so.  Or, having reluctantly yielded to his wish, she should have vowed to keep his position unfilled.  Through her acquiescence in this appalling turn of events, she tacitly acknowledged the right of the US to bully and browbeat its ally and made a mockery of the UK’s role as an independent nation which
charts its own course.    
 
Through his novel approach to diplomacy, Mr Trump has acquired two lapdogs: as well as a Japanese shiba inu, he can now boast ownership of an English terrier.  Meanwhile, whereas he might have used brute force to subdue one Kim, there is another Kim here in Asia who remains impervious to all his blandishments.     

  • 2019.07.15 Monday
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  • 10:49
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